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Wendell Steavenson is the author of Stories I Stole about Georgia, The Weight of a Mustard Seed about Saddam’s Iraq and Circling the Square, Stories from the Egyptian Revolution. She contributes to the New Yorker, the Guardian and Prospect Magazine, and writes the Eat Life column for Spectator Life. She lives, via the Eurostar, between Paddington and Montmartre.

The British chefs conquering Paris

While traditional Parisian restaurants still stew in a century-old jus, young British chefs are showing the way ahead

Restaurant review: L’Arpège, Paris

Alain Passard is a French chef who has put his faith in vegetables

Restaurant review: Eneko at One Aldwych

Eneko strives to give the hearty cuisine of the Basque Country a refined edge

The unheralded glory of Georgia’s gastronomy

Wendell Steavenson visits Mimino, a restaurant bringing Georgian delicacies to London

Where sampling gin is a serious business

214 Bermondsey is a gin-lovers’ paradise, even if you don’t get a slice of lemon with your G and T

War weary

My Holiday Hell: After six months in a war zone I could not understand relaxation, could not understand safety

A raw deal in a vegan paradise

At Notting Hill’s Nama the food comes clean, crisp and barely cooked

Shetland is the place for perfect fish and chips

The chefs at Frankie’s take fish and chips seriously. And it shows

Cafe society for Hampstead intellectuals

The Coffee Cup isn’t a restaurant. It’s a place where you can have food.

How gentrification killed the jellied eel

Jellied eels were London’s original fast food. That was, until the hipsters arrived in the East End.

Can I convince my father to like chicken?

He is eighty one, walks with a cane, and is a traditional sort of British gent. And he has never liked chicken.

Why breakfast still trumps brunch

Brunch is neither one thing nor another thing. Better to stick with breakfast and lunch.