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    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland 25 February 2011 ALICE by Wheeldon

    Alice in Wonderland. The Royal Ballet. Zenaida Yanowsky courtesy of ROH, Johan Persson, 2011. Costumes by Bob Crowley

    10 exhibitions to look forward to in 2020

    2 January 2020

    From Van Gogh to Don McCullin – 2019 has been a big one in terms of incredible exhibitions. Next year is no different, with a bumper line-up of shows set to take over the capital’s galleries. So whether you prefer contemporary or classical art, photography or pop art – there’s something for everyone on the agenda. Here are some of the best to look forward to in 2020.

    Picasso and Paper, Royal Academy of Arts

    Pablo Picasso, Head of a Woman, Mougains, 1962

    Pablo Picasso, Head of a Woman, Mougains, 1962

    Picasso not only used paper as a canvas for his work but he also experimented with it as a material – using napkins, decorative wallpaper and more to form detailed collages. The Royal Academy of Arts will explore the artist’s relationship with paper in a new exhibition, opening in January. It’s set to feature a whole host of exhibits, too, from documentary footage of the artist at work to sketchbooks where the origins of his masterpieces first took shape. ​Above all, the show will spotlight Picasso’s passion for paper – which spanned his entire lifetime. 25 January -13 April

    Steve McQueen, Tate Modern

    Steve McQueen Static 2009

    Steve McQueen, ​Static, ​2009 Video still, courtesy the artist, Thomas Dane Gallery and Marian Goodman Gallery

    You may have experienced Steve McQueen’s works first-hand in 2019 – he’s the man behind the primary school billboards that were scattered across London. Next year, Tate Modern will host ​the first major exhibition of his work since he won the Turner Prize, 20 years ago. It’s set to feature film, photography and sculpture – paying homage to his talents as an artist, director and screenwriter. Guests should expect large scale, immersive video installations and – considering McQueen won an Oscar for his filmmaking – they’re bound to be quite something. 13 February – 11 May

    David Hockney: Drawing from Life, National Portrait Gallery

    This exhibition will be shining a light on David Hockney’s drawings (rather than his famous paintings) – something which hasn’t been done by a gallery for almost 20 years. There will be plenty to soak up, too, with 150 pencil, pastel, ink and watercolour pieces on display – from the 1950s to present. Some works to look out for include Hockey’s sketchbooks taken from his school days as well as intimate portraits of those close to his heart, such as his mother​ Laura Hockney and muse ​Celia Birtwell. 27 February – 28 June

    Andy Warhol, Tate Modern

    Andy Warhol (1928 –1987) Marilyn Diptych 1962 Tate © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc / Artists Right Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London

    Andy Warhol (1928 –1987) Marilyn Diptych 1962 Tate © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc / Artists Right Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London

    Tate Modern will host a retrospective on ​American artist Andy Warhol in 2020.​ His iconic pop art images of ​Marilyn Monroe and Campbell’s soup cans will be making an appearance, alongside works never seen in the UK before – making this show quite the spectacle. His Ladies and Gentleman series, which features portraits of black of Latinx drag queens and trans women, will be on show for the first time in three decades. Guests will be able to play with a selection of immersive pieces, such as Warhol’s floating Silver Clouds, and experience his psychedelic multimedia piece, ​Exploding Plastic Inevitable. 16 March – 6 September

    Cecil Beaton’s Bright Young Things​, National Portrait Gallery

    Baba Beaton as Heloise in Great Lovers Pageant, Cecil Beaton, Courtesy of National Portrait Gallery

    Baba Beaton as Heloise in Great Lovers Pageant, Cecil Beaton, Courtesy of National Portrait Gallery

    The National Portrait Gallery will be transporting visitors back to the glitz and glamour of the 1920s and 30s in its upcoming show. The exhibition will bring to life the ​eccentricity and decadence of Britain in the early twentieth century, through the eyes of photographer Cecil Beaton. Portraits of the “Bright Young Things” will make up the show, with avant-garde, artists and writers, socialites and partygoers – many of whom Beaton called friends. The exhibition will not only give a glimpse into the lavish life of the British upper class, but will also chart the photographer’s personal journey from suburban schoolboy to celebrated star. 12 March – 7 June

    Turner’s Modern World​, Tate Britain

    JMW Turner Rain, Steam and Speed - the Great Western Railway, courtesy of The National Gallery

    JMW Turner Rain, Steam and Speed – the Great Western Railway, courtesy of The National Gallery

    2020 is set to be a big year for exhibitions on British artists and one gallery is paying homage to one of the most famous painters of the Romantic era – J.M.W. Turner. Tate Britain is hosting a landmark exhibition, bringing together the artist’s works from around the globe. Turner – who

    lived during the peak of the industrial revolution – is known for ​incorporating these modern advances in his art, and for refusing to shy away from them – unlike other creatives of the time. As a result, a number of his pieces feature steam boats and railway engines. The works on display will showcase Turner’s interest in new industry and technology and will give a glimpse of what it was like living through political events of the time, such as the Napoleonic War. 28 October 2020 – 7 March 2021

    Artemisia, National Gallery

    Self Portrait as Saint Catherine of Alexandria © The National Gallery, London 

    Italian Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi was one of the most celebrated artists of the 17th century and the first major UK exhibition of her work will run at the National Gallery in 2020. Gentileschi was a groundbreaking artist in more ways than one and the show will hone in on her successful career as a painter – which spanned for more than 40 years. Not only did she thrive when women artists struggled to be accepted, but she was also the first woman to gain membership to the artists’ academy – the Accademia delle Arti del Disegno – in Florence. This exhibition will fuse some of her best-known paintings and self-portraits along with some of her lesser-known works, for a vibrant and varied showcase. 6 April – 26 July

    After Empire: Photographing Britain and the ​World, Tate Britain

    John Gay. ​A young man at Speaker’s Corner in Hyde Park, London 1​ 960–1962, courtesy of Historic England/Tate Britain

    John Gay. ​A young man at Speaker’s Corner in Hyde Park, London 1​ 960–1962, courtesy of Historic England/Tate Britain

    Following on from the critically acclaimed Don McCullin exhibition, Tate Britain will be hosting another documentary photography show in 2020. Works will span from the end of the Second World War to the election of Margaret Thatcher in 1979 – giving a glimpse into a turbulent time in British life. Both famous and lesser-known photographers will make up the show, highlighting what’s come to be known as the golden age of photography in post-war Britain. 30 June – 27 September

    Tracey Emin/Edvard Munch: Loneliness of the Soul, The Royal Academy of Arts

    Later in 2020, the Royal Academy of Arts will offer a two-for-one show, focusing on two widely respected artists – Tracey Emin and Edvard Munch. The exhibition is set to explore Emin’s long-standing fascination with Munch. Both artists are known for their ability to capture raw emotion. But this show will hone in on how Munch has inspired Emin as an artist – particularly in the way that he explores the human psyche. 15 November 2020 – 28 February 2021

    Alice: Curiouser and Curiouser​, V&A

    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland 25 February 2011 ALICE by Wheeldon

    Alice in Wonderland. The Royal Ballet. Zenaida Yanowsky courtesy of ROH, Johan Persson, 2011. Costumes by Bob Crowley

    Kids and big kids alike are likely to enjoy this upcoming exhibition at the V&A which gives visitors a taste of ​Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland. The show will take a dive down the rabbit hole, exploring the different interpretations of the story, since its publication back in ​1865. ​John Tenniel’s original drawings for the book’s first edition will feature, alongside more contemporary paintings inspired by the literary classic. It will also trace Hollywood’s evolution of the story, from the first cinematic retelling in 1903 to Tim Burton’s experimental version in 2010. This is one not to be missed by literature lovers. 27 June 2020 – January 10, 2021