Gallery: Picasso 1932 at Tate Modern

A new exhibition focuses on an intensely creative year in the life of the great artist

Tate Modern is staging its first ever solo exhibition of Pablo Picasso’s work, Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy. The show, which runs from March 8 – September 9, features more than 100 paintings, sculptures and works on paper and takes visitors on a journey through a pivotal and tumultuous year in the life of the great artist. In 1932, Picasso created some of his most revered works, from Nude Woman in a Red Armchair to his series of ink drawings of the Crucifixion. Other highlights of the show include Girl Before a Mirror, loaned from New York’s The Museum of Modern Art, and The Dream, which has never been exhibited in the UK before.

Achim Borchardt-Hume, director of exhibitions at Tate Modern and co-curator of the exhibition, said: ‘Picasso famously described painting as “just another form of keeping a diary”. This exhibition invites you to get close to the artist, to his ways of thinking and working, and to the tribulations of his personal life at a pivotal moment in his career. Visitors will be able to walk through 12 months of Picasso’s life and creative decision-making, to see many of his most ground-breaking and best-loved works in a surprising new light.’

See below for a gallery of paintings that feature in the exhibition.

Nude Woman in a Red Armchair (1932, Tate, © Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018)

The Dream (1932, private collection, © Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018)

Girl Before A Mirror (1932, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018)

Self-Portrait (1901, Musee National Picasso, Paris, © Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018)

Reclining Nude (1932, private collection, © Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018)

Portrait of Olga in an Armchair (1918, Musee National Picasso, Paris, © Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018)

The Crucifixion (1932, Musee National Picasso, Paris, © Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018)

Pablo Picasso (1932 by Cecil Beaton, © The Cecil Beaton Studio Archive at Sotheby’s)


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