Gallery: Pink Floyd at the V&A

A preview of Their Mortal Remains, the blockbuster exhibition charting Pink Floyd’s stellar career

Following the success of its David Bowie retrospective in 2016, the V&A is now giving Pink Floyd the blockbuster treatment. Opening on Saturday (May 13), Their Mortal Remains marks the 50th anniversary of the band’s first album, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, and debut single, Arnold Layne.

This audio-visual show features photographs, artefacts, live footage and specially created interactive installations, including a recreation of the stage set used during the 1980-1 tour for The Wall. Other exhibits include a holographic image bringing to life The Dark Side Of The Moon’s famous prism and the punishment book and cane from the Cambridge and County High School for Boys, where the band’s original guitarist and vocalist Syd Barrett and bass guitarist, vocalist and songwriter Roger Waters were pupils in the late 1950s.

Several of David Gilmour’s guitars, including his renowned ‘black Strat’, feature in the exhibition and Gilmour, along with Waters and other Pink Floyd members, Nick Mason and the late Richard Wright, can be heard as visitors pass through the gallery discussing the band’s experiences and artistic experiments. Their Mortal Remains runs until October 1. To find out more information and to book tickets, go here.

An installation inspired by The Wall at the V&A show (Getty)

One of the gallery spaces (Getty)

The many face of Floyd (Getty)

The cover image of Animals on display (Getty)

Mannequins in lightbulb suits (Getty)

The band pictured in Belsize Park in 1971 (Pink Floyd Music Ltd/Storm Thorgerson/Aubrey ‘Po’ Powell)

Poster for The Massed Gadgets of Auximines (Victoria and Albert Museum, London)

Rotating mirrorball with petals, 1973 -1977 (Paula Webb Stainton)

David Gilmour playing his black strat circa 1973 (Jill Furmanovsky)

A painting by Syd Barrett (Syd Barrett Family Ltd)

Nick Mason loading the band’s van
(Pink Floyd Archive)

Punishment book and cane (Pink Floyd Music Ltd)

Johnny Rotten wearing his infamous ‘I Hate Pink Floyd’ T-shirt in 1977 (Ray Stevenson)

The Teacher illustration (Roger Waters, 1978)


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